Keynote speakers

Sarah Eaton

Friday, June 11th, 16:00 CEST

Sarah Eaton

Sarah Elaine Eaton, Ph.D. has been teaching in higher education since 1994, but around 2012. She shifted to a mostly online format, as her huniversity has a large graduate program (900+ students) who take their courses with their in blended or online formats. Between graduate-level courses, as well as continuing professional development courses, she thinks she has taught over 100 online courses (of varying lengths) over the past 10 years, with about 50 of them being graduate-level (masters and doctoral) courses.
She did a research project a few years ago at the University of Calgary where she was in the team which built an online tutorial for academic integrity for students in their online and blended research projects. They were a research team of 3, and Thet received some funding to do the project. It was only an institutional-level project, but it should provide an evidence base to speak from, and she can certainly speak to trends as they are reflected in the current research literature.

Info: https://werklund.ucalgary.ca/sarah-eaton
GoogleScholar: https://scholar.google.com.au/citations?hl=cs&user=EmD2JcoAAAAJ
ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Sarah_Eaton
Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSarahEaton

Communities of Integrity: Engaging Ethically Online for Teaching, Learning, and Research

The COVID-19 crisis challenged us to learn, teach, and work in ways we never had before. As we move further into 2021 more educational institutions are thinking about how online teaching and learning can become a permanent way of offering programs. However, there are still ethical considerations that merit deeper consideration. Before the pandemic, there was 20 years of research from various countries to show there was less misconduct in online courses than in face-to-face courses, yet during COVID-19 academic and research misconduct increased dramatically around the world. So, what happened? And how do we move forward from here? Join us for an evidence-informed keynote about how to support ethical teaching, learning, and researching in online and blended contexts in 2021 and beyond.

video

Erika Löfström

Thursday, June 10th, 9:00 CEST

Erika Löfström

Dr. Erika Löfström is a professor of Education at the University of Helsinki, Faculty of Educational Sciences where she leads a primary teacher education program. She has a longstanding interest in research ethics and integrity. Her research areas include research ethics and integrity and related learning and supervision processes, as well as academic writing and plagiarism. She has published her research in journals such as e.g. Higher Education, Studies in Higher Education, International Journal for Educational Integrity, Ethics & Behavior, and Journal of Academic Ethics. She has collaborated actively with colleagues across Europe, e.g. in the H2020-funded projects Virt2ue (2018-2021) and ENERI European Network of Research Ethics and Research Integrity (2016-2019).

She teaches research ethics/integrity to undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral students, as well as faculty and experts in these areas and, is a keen developer of research ethics/integrity training.

Löfström is a long-time chair of the non-medical ethics review board at the University of Helsinki, and has, in that capacity, actively developed local ethics review practices as well as guidelines at the national level. She is a board member of the Academy of Finland and vice-chair of the Finnish National Board on Research Integrity. She also chairs the group that oversees and develops the national research integrity advisor system established by the Finnish National Board on Research Integrity.

Info: https://researchportal.helsinki.fi/en/persons/erika-löfström”
ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Erika_Loefstroem
Twitter: https://twitter.com/elofstro

Supervision as an arena for teaching and learning academic integrity and research ethics

Academia depends on fostering new generations of researchers and teachers who advance our common knowledge base and in turn, foster new generations. It is not irrelevant how the new generations are equipped with relevant knowledge and competences. What values and behaviors they exhibit depend to a great extent on the academic culture, which they are socialized in. Supervisors play a crucial role in the learning processes. Students and novice researchers pick up both good and undesirable practices from their supervisors. In my talk I focus on supervision as a key activity through which new generations of academics learn about research ethics and about values and behaviors related to integrity. I answer the question, how does integrity and ethics emerge and manifest themselves in the supervisory relationship, and how do supervisors and supervisees perceive the relationships in terms of integrity, ethics and associated challenges. While focus is on the supervisory relationship, I will also discuss implications for meso and macro levels in a systems perspective, i.e. departmental and national levels.
video

Guy Curtis

Wednesday, June 9th, 10:00 CEST

Guy Curtis

Dr. Guy Curtis is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Psychological Science at the University of Western Australia. He has a long-standing interest in academic integrity and has been researching student plagiarism and cheating for over 15 years. Guy has conducted research on cultural, demographic, and psychological predictors of plagiarism and cheating, the prevalence of plagiarism and cheating among students, and interventions designed to educate students and university staff about academic integrity. In 2019/20, Guy was part of a team that developed an academic integrity toolkit for the Australian higher education standard regulator: https://www.teqsa.gov.au/academic-integrity-toolkit. He has published over 40 journal articles and is an Associate Editor of Higher Education Research & Development, the Australian Journal of Psychology, and Frontiers in Psychology. Guy’s work and profiles can be found here:

UWA: https://research-repository.uwa.edu.au/en/persons/guy-curtis
GoogleScholar: https://scholar.google.com.au/citations?user=IHsYQB0AAAAJ&hl=en
ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Guy_Curtis2
Twitter: https://twitter.com/GuyCurtis10

Evolving an understanding of academic integrity

I have been conducting research on academic integrity, on and off, for over 15 years, with academic integrity becoming the increasing focus of my research. This presentation will summarize my research journey. Starting in 2004, I investigated the prevalence, understanding, and perceived seriousness of plagiarism, and I’ve repeated this investigation every 5 years since. This research has suggested how plagiarism trends are changing, why they might be changing, and how to change them. Additionally, as a psychologist, I’ve become increasingly interested in psychology of plagiarism and cheating, raising questions such as why do students plagiarise, what makes cheaters different from non-cheaters, and how do personality, attitudes, and emotions interact to predict cheating and plagiarism?
video

Uppsala University
Mendel University in Brno
ENAI
Gold Sponsors
Ouriginal
turnitin
antiplagiat
Silver Sponsors
studiosity
StrikePlagiarism.com
Compilatio
Bronze Sponsors
Springer